Stacking Laser Projectors for better perceived brightness of the laser output

Stacking Laser Projectors for better perceived brightness of the laser output


Hey guys it’s john from lazy ninja productions
and I’m out at at the alamo city comic con 2017 running laser marquee for the people
coming in to the event. So what I figured out what to do is kind of
do a very very different kind of tutorial. I’m in a kind of unique situation. I just sold off all of my really high-powered
lasers, so with the laser marquee I needed to bring out a couple, two and a half watt
lasers that I’m actually double stacking and aligning. So I can get somewhat more brightness than
I would with just a single projector. So this is a trick I learned from way back
in the day, when I used to work with 3 gun crt projectors. And we would not only have to align all three
of those…people are excited for this tutorial what can I say umm…yes so this is a trick
I learned back in the day, when not only when we have to align all three guns on the crts,
but we would also double stack those. Something’s still useful for like dlp projectors
if you’ve got, a crosshatch pattern and compute geometric correction. So let’s take a look at this first step – we’re
taking a look at the projection zone configuration dialog inside of pangolin beyond. The two zones and I’m going to be focused
on here, are the main graphic zone and the scanner two main. All those are the two zones that I’m going
to be overlapping with each other. What I want to first do is select the alignment
configuration or the alignment test pattern for both main graphics and for the scanner
two main. So look at the wall. I can actually see where my two patterns are
projected on the wall. Now the first step is to align the centers
of the two images. So I’m on, you know, my two zones that I’m
using here are the main graphic zone and scanner two. Now I’m already set to position I’ve already
adjusted the relative size. I want my second scan zone to be slightly
larger than my first one. So what I’m going to do is I’m going to adjust
the position and get the centers to line up as much as possible. So you’re going to start to see, the centers
come together. And we’ll kind of fine-tune this in here. So I now have my one center line now, I’m
going to adjust the left and right. And this isn’t going to be perfect – so I’m
going to adjust this when I get to fine tuning, geometric correction with the crosshatch pattern. But the center x and the numbers are now roughly
centered. You can see that scan zone six, which is scanner
number two, is slightly larger than scan zone one. Which is exactly what we want. So that I have my four corners. And I’m going to have the four corners match
to the side. So because my lower right corner is the trickier
of the two right now, that’ll be the first one that we line up. Next I’m going to do the same thing on the
lower left corner. Adjust this guy and this time I’m going to
use the keyboard to dial this thing. Well this time I’m actually going to drag
it a little bit with the mouse, so it’s slightly lined up and then I’m going to fine-tune it
with the keyboard. Now same thing with my top left in my top
right corner. We’re going to select the point we’re going
to eyeball it in with the mouse. Get it into roughly the right position and
then we are now going to walk it in with the keyboard. The idea being that you want the dots in the
corners to line up as much as possible. We’re not too worried about the full side
alignment because we will adjust those when we get to the actual detail points, when we
move the across edge. And now the last one is going to be the top-right
corner. And we will walk this guy in, walk this guy
in, and we’ve got a good ballpark approximation. Now that we’ve got all four corners matched
up, now we’re going to come over and change from our basic alignment to our crosshatch. Now we have a crosshatch on all four corners. Come back to my secondary scanner. We could take a look here. And the idea is you could see that we’ve got
a lot of around the camera, looks like there’s a lot of flicker, but actually that’s not
too bad. But we’ll start with the one by one pattern
and that will give us a chance to fine-tune our corners. So I’ll start with the lower left. And lower left I’m going to just walk in with
my mouse or with my my arrow keys on my keyboard. And you want to eyeball this, really focus
on the area that you’re working on, because when this comes together you’ll see it almost
click with your eyes. You’ll see a lot of flicker and then all of
a sudden the flickering will stop. So you can kind of see it’s even visible in
the camera the lower left order looks fairly solid. We’ll do the same thing now lower right corner. And a little bit of a flicker I’m going to
walk it in. So now with all four corners really dialed
in with the crosshatch pattern, I’m going to come back to my 3×3 pattern. And this gives me a chance to really adjust
several new areas that weren’t in the pattern before. Center top, top center left center, right
center and lower center. This will give us a cross pattern that we
can kind of adjust. So let’s do this in the cooking show format
and I’m going to adjust those real quick. And now cooking show format wise, I have my
top left right and bottom adjusted. Now it’s again, it’s kind of hard to tell
because the refresh rate on the camera. The trick is really to let your eyes relax. While you’re looking at the lines with what
you’ll see is, you’ll see a lot of flickered a lot of jumping. When you relax your eyes and you actually
get both of both areas aligned correctly, it will literally just kind of pop and click
into place. So yeah there’s no real way, sorry I’m using
a cell phone camera, there we go that’s kind of better so we don’t have as much flicker,
but now I’m going to go ahead and switch this over. We’re going to take a look at the 5 by 5 pattern,
which is going to give us several new areas. So now you see, we’ve gotten all the new areas
of the 5×5 aligned. I had to go back again, because every little
adjustment that you make, is going to affect the overall image. So as I was making those adjustments I did
have to go back and readjust my corners and readjust my top, left, right and bottom centers. But now we’ve got a pretty good image. Not a whole lot of fine-tuning I need to do,
but it’s still worthwhile to point out. You know fine tuning with the 9 by 9 pattern. Now I’ve pretty much got geometric capabilities
all over my entire grid. So my 9 by 9 crosshatch now that this is probably
the most fine-tune this is going to get. I’m going to go ahead and start with the top
left and kind of go over all the intermediate areas between, you know that have now just
been reintroduced and fine-tuned. So after a lot of persistence and trial and
error, we now are readied up and running. This is both zones actually overlap over each
other. You know so you can see we now we don’t have
a whole lot of shadowing or you know it’s hard to tell, with the scan rate again on
the phone, but not a whole lot of flicker or anything like that, I mean it it’s a pretty
solid image. There’s no line doubling or anything like
that. So we’re running through all the different
game of thrones sigils here, you know for the people that are game of thrones fans. You know but overall that’s the that’s all
it really took to get that up and going. So hope you guys enjoy the tutorial.

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