BRITISH IDIOMS and SLANG QUIZ | I Tested a Canadian πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ on her British Slang and Idioms!

BRITISH IDIOMS and SLANG QUIZ | I Tested a Canadian πŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦ on her British Slang and Idioms!


Okay, this is weird with you being here. It is weird. Okay. Hi guys and welcome back to my
channel. I’m joined today by Giselle, who is from the channel Giselle the Expat. Creative. Well? It’s just as creative as mine. Anyway, so today we’re going to test Giselle on
her knowledge of some very British idioms and some slang. How do you feel
about this? I’m nervous, I won’t lie. You should be, there are some
good ones. Now we must say that Giselle does live in the UK. We should also say
that Giselle is not from the UK, she is from… I’m from Canada. So you live in the UK and you’re married to a Brit as well? That’s correct. So yes, I would consider her
an expert on the topic of I don’t know if I’m an expert, but we’ll see. So this was actually quite difficult trying to find some idioms and slang that Giselle might not
know so we’re gonna see how we go with this one and for your watching you can
also try and guess at home as well so are you ready for the first one? I’m
ready as ever. Okay so the first one is a bodge job, a
bodge job, is it like er… messing up something? Yeah it is, yeah, so I could say
something like oh I just had a new kitchen fitted but it was a disaster the
guy did a complete budge job. Yeah that’s similar to an American, yeah, [they say that?] you get like bodge surgeries or whatever, there’s a show, I think. Stealing that from the Americans, obviously. Probably, or maybe they stole it from us?
[maybe] we don’t know. Don’t you use it in Canada? Bodge job? Not really no, it’s not a very Canadian thing to say hmm interesting. Next. Number two, to spend a penny, ooh I need to spend a penny. Does that mean
spend a lot of money? No. Spend a little bit of money? It’s not even related to
money. Oh. Spend a lot of time on? No. [what could it mean?] It means to go for a wee. [What does a penny have to do with a wee?] Because many years ago
one would go to a public toilet and it would cost a penny, now it costs like
[five P] five or ten P, yeah I’ve been to places where it’s like 20 P
where it’s 50 P one place was a pound in London. I was like [that is ridiculous] I was like I’m just gonna pee my pants. I’m not paying a pound to pee. So to spend a penny means to go
for a wee basically or to go to the toilet. So yes, it’s quite an old idiom, I would say like our generation wouldn’t use it but my
grandma used to always say this and she would say I’m just going to spend a
penny but it would be in our house and I used to say but Grandma it’s free you
don’t have to pay for the toilet. I didn’t understand [to be fair, that’s quite
cute though] it is yeah [it’s nicer than saying I need to go to the toilet] yeah or there are some others
that we say like to take a slash. Have you heard of that? That’s more like what
men say [take a slash, no, that’s really aggressive] Yeah I don’t even want to imagine what they’re doing in the toilets. Anyway, number three a curtain
twitcher, a curtain twitcher. My auntie is such a curtain twitcher [two-faced?] No,
think of what curtains are and think of what the twitching may involve if you’re a
curtain twitcher. [I genuinely don’t know, it’s so strange] A curtain twitcher is a person who looks out of the curtains and they’re
really nosey [ah okay so just a nosy neighbor?] Yeah exactly, yeah, and you can see the curtains twitching. They’re a curtain twitcher Do you have a word for that in Canada? No it’s just nosey, nosey neighbor, a nosey Parker is another one we can say. [nosey Parker?] Yeah a nosey Parker. [why a Parker?] I don’t know. [the Brits are so weird] I don’t know who Parker is but we apologise to him [must have been realise nosey] Yeah he was very nosey. Okay number 4. Ta [thank you] yeah [that was
really confusing when I first moved here because I had no idea] yeah [people
kept saying ta and I’m like “ta what?” Like “ta what?” yeah but I don’t even know, it’s already
short enough, why do you guys need to shorten it even more?] Because we’re
lazy [hmm] We are very lazy actually in the UK. Another one that you might hear in
the UK is Cheers, is that something you say in Canada [yeah, of course] like cheers for that [yeah, I mean we don’t really I don’t even know what the Canadian
equivalent of cheers is actually we say cheers as well I guess, especially if you’re like, taking shots or having a pint] Oh no but that’s different, that’s like
Cheers we say cheers as in thank you, so if you’re like, for example, you’re on the bus which is also another weird thing we do,
we actually thank the bus driver as we’re getting off the bus [yeah] like
thank you for not killing us on our way to our destination. [true] But we will say cheers, yeah. You don’t do that? You
know well cheers as thank you. [no no we use it like an alcoholic
beverage circumstances only] There must be alcohol involved for that one. Last one, number five, to throw a spanner
in the works. Oh damn, Polly threw a spanner in the
works when she did that. That was a terrible example [to screw up] nnn-yeah kind of [why do you guys need to complicate things so much?] Because we’re British it’s all we do. [I know] To throw a spanner in the works [no idea, what is it?] It’s when you do something to disrupt or destroy a plan, so you have a plan
and our imaginary friend Polly has done something to disrupt that plan so it
doesn’t go smoothly that’s to throw a spanner in the works [yeah I don’t think
I never use that] Do you have some kind of expression in Canada that you would
use for someone destroying a plan? [Screwing up] Yeah we use that too, to screw up [just screwed up the plan or] or messed we would say here, oh she’s messed up the plan [yeah or bombed the plan or something like that] oh okay [maybe bombed is not a good word to use all the time, but sometimes sometimes we might say it] Well
those are all the idioms that I have so you did well, you’ve got one. Do
tell us below in the comments how many you got at home, hopefully you got more than one. [sorry guys] They were difficult ones, but they are all common they are all ones that we do use, apart from spend a penny, that’s one that we know but we don’t really use, it’s more of a
generation thing. My grandma would say that. Anyway, yes, let us know in the
comments what you got and any final words, Giselle? No, hopefully you did better than I did. [In life? or in the quiz?] In everything [In everything]. Anyway, thank you, guys, for watching. Go check out Giselle’s channel. I have put the link to her channel down in the description. See you very soon. Bye bye. Done!

26 Comments

  • Anik Bd

    December 13, 2019

    Hi i am from London

    Reply
  • Mikael Silva

    December 13, 2019

    I really enjoyed your video, it was extremely useful. Thanks a bunch.

    Reply
  • Jhefferson Andres Montalvo Uriarte

    December 13, 2019

    Hi I'm from PerΓΊ πŸ™‚ both are beautiful 😍😍 greeting

    Reply
  • Redouane Kaci

    December 13, 2019

    Thanks for this excellent video I learn always something new with you.

    Reply
  • Lucy Abraham

    December 13, 2019

    It's botched in the show and bodge is the word there.

    Reply
  • oni Gonzalez

    December 13, 2019

    Thanks

    Reply
  • Physics Channel

    December 13, 2019

    This is probably the first time I listened to Canadian English.
    By the way, I’d like you to make a video about differences between β€œI think,” β€œI guess,” β€œI assume” and β€œI’d say.”

    Reply
  • Lucy Abraham

    December 13, 2019

    I watch many of your videos and recommend them to my friends. ❀️ From Tanzania πŸ‡ΉπŸ‡Ώ

    Reply
  • Qwigly Dee

    December 13, 2019

    Oh!
    I had to look up some words for primary meanings!

    Reply
  • Armando Jimenez

    December 13, 2019

    Hola Emma Thank U for your video, it’s always great to watch it , your Canadian friend is nice and friendly.
    I will be waiting your next video
    Have a nice weekend πŸ˜‰
    Muchas Gracias 😊

    Reply
  • Qwigly Dee

    December 13, 2019

    And your laugh makes learning so pleasant! πŸ™‚

    (a sentence for insta homework)

    Reply
  • Syed Babar Gillani

    December 13, 2019

    😊

    Reply
  • Pronunciation with Emma

    December 13, 2019

    How many of these slang phrases and idioms did you get? πŸ˜„ Did you beat Giselle? πŸ˜‚

    Also, just for fun πŸ˜‰ Giselle also has a video on her channel of her testing me on my Canadian slang! Go and check it out and laugh at how terrible I was πŸ˜… https://youtu.be/2C2licSwAk4

    Reply
  • Shonazar Safaev

    December 13, 2019

    thanks a lot and good luck to you

    Reply
  • Eugenia Litovchenko

    December 13, 2019

    Great video! I love this collaboration, so funny and informative, thank youβ€πŸ˜ƒ

    Reply
  • Hocine Hamdani

    December 13, 2019

    Hi Emma and your frend thank you i like your vidΓ©o that's Good vidΓ©o

    Reply
  • Giselle the Expat

    December 13, 2019

    This was so much fun but damn, I really need to improve my British slangπŸ˜‚πŸ€― Hope everyone else did better than I did!

    Reply
  • SAMIOSEANDO IGLESIAS

    December 13, 2019

    Really…..!
    Why…?

    Reply
  • King Luiso

    December 13, 2019

    Emma's Quiz System: Congratulations! You got 0 correct answers! Honestly, I never pay attention the idioms and slangs as well. The only slang that I learned is Suck at Thanks for this funny and interesting video, Emma. If you need to learn slangs in Spanish (Mexico) I'm here. πŸ˜‰ πŸ’•

    Reply
  • Giorgio V

    December 13, 2019

    Super TOP!!!
    Very funny lesson! And useful too!!
    Thank you girls!

    Reply
  • Daniel Santos

    December 13, 2019

    Now my new nickname on videogames will be slasher πŸ˜…

    Reply
  • Pdro Červera

    December 13, 2019

    I don't get anyone 😬

    Reply
  • Nazzareno Gavini

    December 13, 2019

    You've been really fun. Anyway, I knew these british expressions thanks to "Love English" with Sabrah and Leila. Anyway I didn't really believe that native speakers of different countries than Britain, couldn't really understand them!
    I hope your collaboration, in the near future, with "Love English", "English like a native" with Anna or "English with Lucy".

    Reply
  • Rodrigo da Macena Figueiredo

    December 13, 2019

    Was funny πŸ˜‚, I liked learn about news expression
    Ta

    Reply
  • Rafaela Ponte Elabras

    December 13, 2019

    To spend a penny, I've kicked something like to pay almost nothing for a thing. I would never say "to go for wee". Lol

    Reply
  • Paulo Fernando

    December 13, 2019

    Could you explain to me: Bob is your uncle.

    Reply

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